Reblogged: Sermon: The Commemoration of Martin Luther 2015 (Concordia St. Catherine’s)

In addition to being the birthday of the United States Marine Corps, November 10 is also important for Christians of the Lutheran persuasion because today is Martin Luther’s birthday (1483). The following is a commemorative sermon by the Rev. Dr. John Stephenson given at Concordia Theological Seminary, St. Catherine’s, Ontario in commemoration of Luther’s birth.

Concordia Lutheran Theological Seminary

The following sermon was preached by Rev. Dr John Stephenson in the seminary’s Martin Luther Chapel for a divine service on the occasion of Martin Luther’s birthday.

Commemoration of Martin Luther
10 November 2015
St John 6:52-69

Words are decidedly dangerous things, which is why policemen warn those they arrest that, “Anything you say may be taken down and used in evidence against you.” It’s bad enough when foolish or unguarded words get you in trouble with earthly authorities, but all of us have a courtroom appointment looming ahead, although we are uncertain about the date: “After death comes judgement” (Heb 9:27b) and “We must all appear before the judgement seat of Christ” (2 Cor 5:10). Clever and unscrupulous people can to some extent pull the wool over the eyes of earthly authorities, but there will be no escape when Jesus’ gaze meets yours, there will be no sassy comeback…

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Reblogged: Martin Chemnitz, Pastor and Theologian (Aardvark Alley)

Martin Chemnitz

My unabashed reposting of other people’s material continues with Orycteropus Afer’s post for yesterday’s commemoration of Martin Chemnitz, the “Second Martin” of the Lutheran Reformation.  See an excerpt below after the jump.

Martin Chemnitz, Pastor and Theologian (November 9)

+ Martin Chemnitz, Pastor and Theologian +

9 November AD 1522 – 8 April AD 1586

Today marks the birthday of Martin Chemnitz, Pastor and Confessor. We regard him as, after Martin Luther, the Lutheran Church’s most important theologian. He possessed a penetrating intellect and an almost encyclopedic knowledge of Scripture and the Church Fathers combined with a genuine love for the Church.

Doctrinal quarrels after Luther’s death in 1546 led Chemnitz to give himself fully to the restoration of unity in the Lutheran Church. He became the leading spirit and a principal author of the 1577 Formula of Concord, which settled the doctrinal disputes on the basis of the Scriptures and largely succeeded in restoring unity among Lutherans. Work on the Formula led Chemnitz and others to gather all the normative doctrinal statements confessed by the Lutherans, from the ancient creeds through the Evangelical writings of the 16th Century, into one volume, the Book of Concord.

Chemnitz also authored the four volume Examination of the Council of Trent (1565-1573). This monumental work saw him rigorously subjecting the pronouncements of this Roman Catholic Council to judgment by Scripture and the Church Fathers. The Examination is the definitive Lutheran answer to the Concilium Tridentinum and an outstanding exposition of the faith of the Augsburg Confession.